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Marxian Econ Anonymous 06/30/2020 (Tue) 12:54:15 No. 654769
Let's talk about our empirical, materialist, economic analysis of capitalism. Talk about >rate of profit >classical econophysics >LTV >bussiness cycle >financialization >monetary policy ect Post pdfs, graphs, discuss
>>654769 speaking of rate of profit, this blog post shows how we can access automatically updating graphs of the US rate of profit on the federal reserve website. https://nicolasdvillarreal.wordpress.com/2020/06/17/rate-of-profit-and-the-business-cycle/ https://research.stlouisfed.org/dashboard/53250
>>654769 Nice idea anon then if we need to example something we just share this thread.
>>654769 For the love good at least read chapter 1 of capital before you try to own le commies on the labor theory of value. Last time we had this thread someone claimed to have read capital but couldn't provide a single quote from it and said Marx said things he didn't say. Also watch cockshot's video about the LTV.
So I've read that the Great depression had a deflationary effect on Commodities. I'm a bit of a finance-brainlet/newfag, but what does this mean? The rate of profit on investment decreases for the average commodity, where the commodity is priced like this: c + v → c + v + s. Do the prices decrease in the immediate-term because the surplus varies? So what I mean is that, is C+V+S the exchange value that is paid for on average, and does the Capitalist change the price freely such that it matches average market price with supply/demand BUT the minimum price is determined by Labour and Capital input, ie C+V? I know that the Worker generates the surplus that it sells for. Am I right? Someone Econ pill me.
Honestly the best intro to the basics of marxian econ I know. It's dated (written in the 60s) but it's clear and concise. https://www.marxists.org/archive/mandel/1967/intromet/index.htm
>>654837 In the short term, the market price for a commodity can dip even below its cost price. The commodity appear to no longer have a use value if it no longer has a market with the money to accept it. On the macro level, the decrease in commodity prices during a recession will generally be the result of a falling surplus, though they will also cut down on labor costs to the greatest extent they can.
bump
>>654769 >>654848 This slump is currently happening in the oil market.
>>654769 nice thread. so, can someone explain me why the fuck marx had to change the nomenclature of basically every economic concept? seriously, couldn't he just use "goods" instead of "commodities"?
>>654848 i'm not this >>654837 guy, but i still have some questions. >the market price for a commodity can dip even below its cost price. true, for example the ps3. >The commodity appear to no longer have a use value if it no longer has a market with the money to accept it. how can the use value change? if i need an antidote, you can sell it to me for 50$ or for 500$, but i will still need that antidote. also, how can the market not have money? maybe the demand is so low that the use value is lower than the market value... right? >they will also cut down on labor costs to the greatest extent they can. that's true only in the beginning of the recession, right? in the middle of the recession they start selling assets, right?
>>658099 because goods is a general term which applies even to societies which do not use markets. commodities are spefic to the historical epoch of capitalism in marx's formulation
>>658128 Notice I said the use value appears to change. What I was refering to is what happens in a crisis and money runs out. >that's true only in the beginning of the recession, right? in the middle of the recession they start selling assets, right? Sure, but this is due to changing production to meet the new levels of demand, not necessarily to cut cost per unit.

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