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Martial arts thread Anonymous Comrade 06/05/2020 (Fri) 22:46:18 No. 10243
Comrades let's have a thread for martial arts, combat sports and self defense. Striking, grappling, all styles welcome (except fake ass shit). Let's talk about training, techniques, fights, fighters, etc. Here's a fun fact: One of the many achievements of the soviets was founding their own combat system, sambo, which proved to be extremely effective and is still widely practiced today. Also, Judo orange belt here (AMA if you want)
Excellent Idea my good chap. What use is fitness without being able to make use of it?
>>10244 Indeed, the combination of exercising, growing stronger and learning how to fight is one of the reasons I love martial arts
Anyone have advice on increasing speed and endurance in fights?
>>10902 For endurance practice your forms while holding weights
Any one hit that Jiu Jiu?
is it dumb to want to start martial arts off in something with little real sparring ?
>>10958 It's not bad at all. I think sparring is the real deal, but it's better than not doing anything.
>>10902 Muscle memory is essential for building up speed, and it requires practicing something over and over again. I trained with an olympic judoka once, and his throws were so incredibly fast I was baffled. Why is this? Simply because these guys practice each throw thousands and thousands of times. Their bodies are so used they go into cruise control and do it automatically. This is what muscle memory is all about. The same concept applies in boxing and other martial arts and many other things.
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So what exactly is so Brazilian about Brazilian Jiu Jitsu?
>>11039 Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu is a variant of Kosen Judo (which is a variant of Judo, and Judo is itself a reform of "traditional" japanese Jiu-Jitsu) invented in Brazil by Mitsuyo Maeda (a japanese man who came to South America to spread Kosen Judo, but he settled with with the Gracie family, a brazilian family with scottish ancestry). Maeda with the Gracies changed Kosen Judo to a new form of Judo/Jiu-Jitsu then spread their new martial art all over of Brazil, the "Gracie Jiu-Jutsu" but then other brazilian dojos had appropriate for themselves Gracie Jiu-Jitsu (like Machado) and then rename it "Brazilian Jiu-Jutsu".
RIP Adbulmanap Nurmagomedov
>>11188 Nice trips and dubs... somethings fishy about this death TBH.
>>11009 Thanks for the advice. I sort of knew this, but you've put it in a new perspective for me.
>>11009 >>11035 Also putting emotion into your punches helps them increase speed, that's how Tyson was so powerful.
>>11202 >something fishy who would have a motive for murder? Dagestani mobsters or something? Some enemy of Ramzen Kadyrov?
>>11972 Unironically both would have a motive, but more likely he probably had some ailment, the doctors couldn't be assed enough to actually bother confirming WHAT caused the death, and just wrote COVID on the death certificate because it vaguely matched the results. >inb4 that can't happen several doctors have come out about being told by their higher-ups to just write off even a hint of COVID in a recent death as caused by it even if it could have been Pneumonia or cardiac arrest, basically its to rack up the numbers for the hospital budget so that they get more 'funding' and the media gets to fear-monger a bit more to keep people paranoid. Its a big porky mess.
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>>11669 Mike Tyson is 100% our guy. Tyson said he read works by Marx, Mao, and Che Guevara while in prison, and that he was so inspired by Mao he got a tattoo of him. Later he also visited his mausoleum and said he felt insignificant next to it. I also read in his autobiography that his legendary trainer Cus D'Amato was a socialist who loved Castro and Che. How many other leftists have there been in martial arts?
>>11987 Was Muhammad Ali a leftist? I bet he sorta was.
>>11988 He was a bit black nationalist, but he was basically Maoist. He really liked the USSR.
How about jackie chan? From what I’ve seen so far he seems to be a ccp loving billionaire porky. Is he a tankie or what
>>11990 He's doesn't really have n ideology, he really only cares about his films and his martial arts, so politics are largely irrelevant to him, he just goes wtih the flow as long as he gets to do his work.
>>11990 Jackie Chan is whatever the CCP is.
>>11987 Reminder Tyson has a podcast where he smokes weed : https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLpg7wyKXmXm0thr_lc0eUbSxkg-3cEGTU
>>12000 He smokes 40,000 dollars of weed a month and keeps trying to drop truthbombs on his guests lmao
>>12002 >smokes 40,000 dollars of weed a month Source?
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I'm planning to start seriously practicing a martial art (most likely kyokushin) once sports facilities open up, with the aim of possibly making it to a professional level. I'm quite serious about it, I don't have much else going on for me so I might as well pursue martial arts as a constructive hobby. But here's the problem: I'm 25 and have no experience in professional sports at all. I have a decent amount of physical strength from lifting on and off the last few years, but that is about it. Is it at all possible for me to make it, or it's too late?
>>12127 >with the aim of possibly making it to a professional level Karate has no real professional scene such as boxing/kickboxing/MMA, only amateur competitions. You won't make a lot of money with karate.
>>12127 Anyone can learn a martial art at any age, and you can compete in plenty of amateur competitions and enjoy the sport. But I'd say becoming professional is another world. In stuff like boxing and MMA, most people who go pro at, say, 20 years old had amateur careers before that and had been training since childhood or teenage years. They train hard about everyday of the week, multiple times a day. You have to ask yourself if that's really what you want, if you can do it, if you have the time, the money, etc.
>>12169 >at any age Before the age of 6 most kids are not disciplined enough to learn anything of value... unless they're asian and thus strictly disciplined at home. >
>>12170 You don't say.
>>12260 He grows his own weed, he doesn't need to BUY it.
>>10983 what would be a good place to start once COVID goes away
>>12366 Yoga.
>>12367 is this serious?
>>12368 Partially. I've been so physically inactive the last couple of months that I've noticed becoming way more stiff. If you're aiming for something involving kicks yoga could actually be a very good stating point, as yoga primarily involves stretching, stretching and more stretching. Most men beginners in kickboxing classes aren't flexible enough to do head-kicks even after 12 months usually.
>>12370 I'm actually pretty flexible as is... like more flexible that most of my women friends. Is there more to gain out of Yoga beyond improved flexibility?
>>12370 >aren't flexible enough to do head-kicks even after 12 months usually. That's cause traditional martial arts don't have stretches for shits and giggles. I used to be unable to do a split as a kid. As an adult I can quite literally knee myself in the face with no effort if I'm not careful and casually drop into a split and rise up again. How? Stretch warm-ups and excessive axe kicks. As well as pushing your body to its limit with each kick and punch.
>>12371 Maybe in lessening anxiety problems? Next to stretching it's a lot of learning how to keep a cool head, breathing exercises, etc. If you're not muscular maybe pick up swimming/gymnastics if you want to be really prepared. >no sparring This is a bit tricky. Maybe kali/eskrima or krav maga? Because I don't want to give bad advice either. Most martial arts that are good become good because the techniques they relay are tested through sparring. Martial arts with little to no sparring is usually more a kin to intricate systems of dance rather than intricate systems of combat. Since kali/eskrima and krav maga are systems involivng weapons and such they are very hard to spar in (but at very advanced levels they spar too), but I'm not sure this is the answer you were looking for. The streamlined answer to what the best hand-to-hand combat systems are you'd get this as a response: picking 2-4: muay thai, sanshou/kickboxing, submission wrestling, judo, BJJ to then go on to bringing this style of yours into more generalized MMA gyms.
>>12374 >Cont. (forgot one) Another honorable mention is vovinam.
>>12374 >muay thai, sanshou/kickboxing, submission wrestling, judo, BJJ Okay I'll try to ease myself into something. Your whole spiel about sparring has kind of convinced me of its importance at least at some point in the future. Are any of these styles known for being more or less welcoming to new comers or does it really just depend on the gym in your area?
>>12377 I was kind of nervous in the beginning too, but in my case the gym (x striking sport) was very welcoming, helpful and non-pretentiously educational (teaching like a learned peer rather than a Karate-Hirohito). Just search out your age-/height-/weight-fraction of the group and acquaint yourself with them. Also sometimes there will be one or two assholes with ego problems that might lowkey try to make training/sparring a fight, but as long as you have a backbone, communicate your boundaries loudly and clearly they'll get snapped back into reality. Narcissists usually prey on people with low self-esteem, so as long as such behavior is highlighted socially either indirectly or directly they'll either conform or eventually get kicked out (teachers usually don't tolerate it when they catch eye of it happening).
Choose the style with the forms you'd like to execute the most. Every other aspect is meaningless. Every other advice is bullshit.
Are you worried about CTE at all? Judoka don't get punch drunk like football players but I was just wondering. I'm going to start up again once quarantine ends.
If you want to do grappling and wrestling, go for Sambo - the Russian military self-defense martial art. That combined with kick-boxing or Tae Kwon Do is the best combo. Essentially however, Jeet Kun Do is the best.
>>12371 >I'm actually pretty flexible as is uwu... like more flexible that most of my women friends~ L O N D O N O N D O N
>>13197 Do you know some Jeet Kun Do fighters who did kickboxing fights or at least full-contact karate fights?
>>13195 >Are you worried about CTE at all? Yes actually (and all of us should, considering our primary revolutionary task). As long as you don't enter into competitions I think you could be fine. CTE can develop in association football players heading the ball, which is concerning. If one wants to be really cautious then regular fitness / gymnastics + martial arts like escrima and/or more grappling-oriented arts such as judo like you mentioned + shooting ranges could be a good set of alternatives. I looked upon martial arts as systems of techniques that are good to practice for a shorter period of time and to thus memorize (muscle memory) the basics, to carry on with you for an elevated base-level of defense. >>13197 >>13218 Sambo I agree on, it's really good. With jeet kune do I'm a bit more cautious. It hasn't performed very well in matches (I blame its wing chun influence; their system of "boxing" and """blocking""" is atrocious). I'd recommend vovinam or sanshou as more robust, well-tested alternatives for jeet kune do.
>>13222 > their system of "boxing" and """blocking""" is atrocious You have clearly never fought a wing chun master.
>>13199 What?
I do HEMA stuff which is pretty dope. But if you're looking for variety, it ain't it. All pretty much boils down to 32 similar techniques with local flavour (like Italian Style, English Style, German Style, etc.). Also very limited ground work, but the essence "back in the day" seems to be if you were on the ground you were fucked. Either getting a beat down from the boys, drowing in mud, getting stabbed by a dagger or mashed by a hammer, or just plain ol' "not gentlemanly". Still, its nice fun. Add in some meme stuff like pugilism, DDLR, and Bartitsu, and they're very nice concise systems. If you want to practice but there are no HEMA places locally, just do judo both with and without gi, 60 hours class time each. And if possible add some free style wrestling and/or greco-roman. Throw in some boxing and muaythai for kicks (savate if you can locally too) and that's about it.
>>13239 LOL all this fake-master showboating shit. None of these faggots are masters. There's a channel made by an actual shaolin fighter who goes around debunking these people who claim to be "Masters".
>>13246 Do these shaolin "fighter" do actual fights?
>>13195 No. I think judo is pretty safe when it comes to that. Training and fighting are done on a protective mat, and the first thing they teach you when starting judo is how to fall correctly (ukemi) and to never ever land with your head. Of course I did hit my head a bunch of times during the first weeks, but generally it doesn't happen anymore.
>>13280 I don't think they do
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So whoever wins this fight is the certified GOAT martial artist in human history, right? https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jY4tYBkz-Fw My money's on Cormier, the strikes are too sharp and his wrestling is Godly. Just look at how he ragdolls Hendo here (20:48 to 24:20 in the vid): https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sY6LAEQ4pBE DC's most likely gonna ragdoll Stipe in a similar way come Saturday night. I just don't see any other outcome as particularly plausible tbh. DC's arguably already GOAT anyway https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Rf7H1w7JuGQ btw crackstreams (dot) com to watch it free this weekend
>>14813 DC is my personal favorite between the two, mostly because I really like wrestling as an ex pro wrestling fan. But after I saw the second fight, I don't know who will win the third one, they really are equal to me, they could do a fourth or fifth fight, the results would be different each times.
>>12375 >Vovinam Here's an example of the style against a tried-and-true muay thai fighter from Thailand, fighting under kickboxing rules (18min) >Vovinam (Vietnam) VS Muay Thai (Thailand) finals in China https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XSmSnbRUvc0 I find it similar to Chinese sanshou kickboxing in that it utilizes very smart takedowns that aren't really a thing in 'normal' western kickboxing, muay thai, TKD, karate or mainstream teachings of MMA striking/takedowns (yet?...).
>>14923 That some very cool takedowns but what do you do after? I see that in a kickboxing match the referee stand up your opponent and you get some points by the judges but what would a vovinam/sanshou fighter would do after the takedown in a MMA or street fight?
>>15031 >what would a vovinam/sanshou fighter would do after the takedown in a MMA [fight] Well my argument is that this is just a better striking style most probably, that is, better than the likes of muay thai, western kickboxing, TKD, karate, savate. Why? Because it transitions more smoothly to what I call different modules of fighting techniques. So let's say he did a takedown in MMA. Here he has several options. One is to allow himself to rest from a lack of barrages of attacks and for his opponent to expend energy to stand up. This has strategic consequences for later rounds. Or he could transition in-to the realm of submission wrestling, or of the opponent mounts him, BJJ. >or street fight? Now here's a completely different scenario. In real life fighting from your back is basically suicidal, so that eliminates one module of techniques (BJJ). What you're left with is striking and submission wrestling. Good thing most of the world's population lives in urban areas today, since that means you, with your throws, have an incredible advantage vs an opponent that took a more standard kickboxing style. The same goes for judokas. You are "punching" with concrete. This is an immense advantage in street fights. Often times it takes no more than one successful throw outside for an opponent to reconsider and exit the conflict.
>tfw contact sports and martial arts will be the last activities to come back after lockdown ends Fucking why
>>12374 >Since kali/eskrima and krav maga are systems involivng weapons and such they are very hard to spar in Arnis and many other weapons arts actually do something that not many unarmed combat systems have picked up on (sadly to their detriment): they have dynamic context drills where blocks and counters are practiced in a continuous activity with a partner.
>>10243 I'm trying to get into more social sports now that I've improved my cardio a bit but I'm torn between doing boxing and doing judo, there are good places for both in my area but I only have time for one and don't know which to go with I get kind of nervous around people as well and all the boxing gyms in my area are pretty hard old school places so I'd feel kind of nervous going into one but it looks really interesting, I've done a little judo in the past as well and I'm tempted to go back but don't know Thoughts? Which is better to go to if I'm going more for the social and combative bits rather than general fitness (already pretty fit cardio wise)?
>>15499 Do you prefer striking or grappling? Anyway, if you want to start easy I would say Judo.
>>15507 I have no idea I just want to do a group sport to meet people and get more excercise but I'm too old and clumsy to start football or other ball sports
>>15514 Find one close to you doesn't matter what then What it is isn't too important that you can get to it easily is
>>15514 >I'm too old I won't ask you how old you are, but usually "old people" do Judo instead of boxing.
>>15516 Mid 20's, never played ball sports growing up and don't have much interest in them but that seems to be the main social sport other than combat sports so idk All my other hobbies are hyper solitary or at least very small groups
>>15518 >Mid 20's That's not old at all, even for combat sports.
>>15523 >That's not old at all Then why do I feel so old and why do my knees make boomer noises
>>15538 >Then why do I feel so old You probably spend too much time on imageboards fill with teenagers and young adults. >why do my knees make boomer noises Because you don't walk enough regularly and probably don't exercise at all.
>>15518 I started kickboxing when I was 30 with no experience at sports. I had basically been drinking alcohol, smoking cigarettes and eatin fast good for 10 years. I was in really bad shape. My age and shape didn't stop me. It should not stop you either.
>>15541 >>15558 I am already quite physically fit see>>15499 its more for the other benefits but thanks for the encouragement
>>15538 Careful with grappling if you have bad knees or had previous surgery. I'd recommend using kneepads.
>>15541 >Because you don't walk enough regularly and probably don't exercise at all. Not him, but I regularly hike and my knees still crack whenever I squat. It's really troublesome because I'm a slav, I should be able to squat without issues.
Hey comrades I’v been working out on and off for a while but it seems like a good martial arts could be a good replacement for physical activity. Also recent events got me thinking it’s somewhat necessary to prepare for the fascist shitstorm that is unfolding in our world. My goals are 1.Building muscle(as to replace workout if possible) 2.Posture correction and building self confidence 3. Self defense, usually confrontation & street fight. Additionally, learning how to disarm someone may be helpful I guess. I’m 21 male 5’9” 145lbs I’ve been interested in Krav Maga not because I intend to throat punch or maim someone, but because I got the impression that it’s more of a modernized martial arts w/ a quick learning curve. Also off question but do you wear masks while training during quarantine? I’m wondering how training would work and if it’s even open during quarantine. Thanks
>>15643 Krav Maga is indeed a good idea for what you're looking for, but makes sure your Krav Maga gym does sparring, preferably a lot.
>>15643 Krav Maga is a military art, it's not what you're looking for if self defense is your interest.
>>15705 There's also Krav Maga for civilians, it's well known.
>>15709 So what does the civilian variant teach then? Conservative punches and kicks? Staying within or outside of the melee range? Standing throws only? Does the civilian variant not emphasize horrible injuring or even killing people in a self-defense scenario? Because it would have to change so much to be appropriate for civilian defense that I'd hesitate to call it Krav Maga anymore. In case part of my argument is still unclear, here's a good article explaining the difference between civilian defense and horribly injuring people: https://www.wayofleastresistance.net/2017/08/3-reasons-why-learning-to-horribly.html
>>15643 Yeah, I wouldn't recommend doing Krav Maga. When it comes to fighting, all militaries have some sort of hand to hand combat training. These courses are designed to build confidence and teach basic fighting skills because they don't want soldiers shitting themselves in a hand to hand fight. Militaries don't have time to train proficient fighters. It's not designed to create athletes or professional fighters. My recommendation would be to go with a proven and known effective martial art, like boxing, muay thai, judo, wrestling, BJJ, etc. Figure out what you like the most, striking or grappling.
>>15729 I was just saying that Krav Maga can also be teach to civilians. But to respond to your argument, some people want to learn "how to horribly injuring someone" when those people talk about "self-defense", they just mean street fighting efficiency. But I agree they should not use the word "self-defense" then.
>>15705 >>15730 What about combat sambo? There’s a gym 25 minutes away, but looking at the sparring videos I’m already intimidated because they look like mma and idk if I’m ready for that kind of ouchie. It gets bonus points for having a soviet origin.
>>15756 "combat" sambo is a meme. It's just a PR. You are lucky if you have some oldie instructor that knows actual sambo, which is pretty useful in a fight. Most "combat" sambo gyms i visited just taught some basic strikes and mma-style grappling. Just try to find some regular sambo gyms.
>>15759 https://www.sambotexas.com/copy-of-affiliate-levels-1 This looks pretty legit though, don’t you think? thanks for helping out
>>15773 Well, it doesn't raise any red flags for me at least. Hard to say without looking at their training course, but you should try at least. Sambo is probably the best wrestling style to learn for streets since it does teach you to always come back to your feet and doesn't focus on ground grappling, which is a very dangerous thing to do on a street for many reasons. After some training i would recommend learning soft falling techniques on hard ground (don't start with pavement at first). Falling techniques that are taught in sport usually are taught with soft ground in mind and can be dangerous to implement on hard ground. Learn to fall and roll on actual ground. Try to always make every fall a roll.
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I will add that if your coach has ears like that, he is the real deal.
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what's the best kung-fu style? i have the choice to learn hung-gar ,zui quan or shaolin
>>15832 >what's the best kung-fu style? Sanda/Sanshou, if it counts. >have the choice to learn hung-gar ,zui quan or shaolin Between those I would say shaolin.
>>15832 Kung Fu isn't even a large overarching martial art like karate, it's just a generic name for Chinese martial arts, of which there is incredible variety. My focus has been karate (an external, "hard" style) for a long time, and the Chinese arts I would most like to learn more about are Wing Chun (an external "soft" style that makes extensive use of dynamic context drills to train interception reflexes), Xing Yi Quan (an "internal" martial art), and Southern Praying Mantis (which blends some internal and external aspects). I'm not very interested in the chi hocus pocus that a lot of internal styles peddle but I do think they have some legitimate ideas when it comes to short-range power generation.
>>15832 Don't look at the style, look at the teacher. He should be the guy who actually done some fighting in his life.
>>15853 >I'm not very interested in the chi hocus pocus that a lot of internal styles peddle Actually chi is just proper breathing in it's essense, though it is a bit bigger than that. If you wanna hear scientific explanations here it is - your breathing is the only thing that is connected to both autonomic (vegetative) and somatic nervous systems. In most cases stuff like heart beating, body temperature and so on are controlled by autonomic system and you can't control it directly through the brain, but you can control your breath and through that you can learn to control some other things, making you able to push the limits of your body a bit farther than you would be able otherwise. It's a bit more complicated than that, but this is the general idea of what chi is. There are of course some fake gurus who will tell shit about cosmic energy or something too.
>>15807 Is it because he's had his ears boxed anon?
>>15919 Cauliflower ear is an occupational hazard for wrestler. If he has them then you know that he at least did some on a serious level.
>>15919 Because the only effective martial arts this far proven to have efficacy are those that require active combat training, and if you practice any martial art with real training you're going to get the cauliflower ear. A cursory scroll through this thread has actual retards advocating karate/wing-tsun/krav maga shit that has never proven itself in cross disciplinary competition. They'll cry that their art is too dangerous for sport but that's bullshit. I did bjj for a while and Gracie-cels constantly cried that Dana White cucked the rules against their style because it's an easier cope than admitting that the meta evolved with the sport and away from their discipline
>>15756 I wouldn't miss a chance to at least try Sambo if it's close to you, since it's not very common outside former eastern bloc countries. Sambo is pretty based, it has a lot of judo throws from what I've seen. Its founder studied at the Kodokan in Japan under Jigoro Kano (founder of judo) and later created Sambo in the USSR.
>>15937 >They'll cry that their art is too dangerous for sport but that's bullshit. Cool macho straw man but no, my assertion is that karate is designed for civilian self-defense, rather than two guys fighting in an arena with rules. And I think it does rather well at that, though obviously there are large quality differences across styles.
>>15937 >only good martial arts fuck your ears up Cope.
>>15937 >and if you practice any martial art with real training you're going to get the cauliflower ear. Not necessarily. Strikers have a lot less chance to get it, compared to wrestlers.
>>15937 >They'll cry that their art is too dangerous for sport but that's bullshit. I did bjj for a while and Gracie-cels constantly cried that Dana White cucked the rules against their style because it's an easier cope than admitting that the meta evolved with the sport and away from their discipline BJJ is pure sport discipline. I would say it is least adapted to actual street fight. So trying to dab on traditional martial arts just makes you look like a salty looser.
Is the presence of reactionaries in martial gyms overblown or i have to go out of my way to find gyms that say that are clearly antifa/no cops etc ?
>>16003 Depends where you go for what like everything else I noticed that there were a lot of pretend tough guy rightoids in the mcdojo's I checked out a few weeks ago, but few to none in the more serious places for mundaner stuff like Boxing and Judo, don't know about Krav Maga and BJJ and the other stuff mentioned in this thread because there's nowhere here to learn that Shit places attract shit people I guess
>>16003 It's a problem everywhere. Disciplines of violence are often used to glorify violence and reactionaries with inferiority complexes are strongly attracted to them.
>>16008 Only in some niche gyms. Besides, it's not like you have time to talk about politics or some other shit anyway if you go to real gym.
Anybody got some good martial arts youtube channels? This guy is really good: https://www.youtube.com/user/Shigashi84
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>>16924 >What martial arts should police officers learn?
>>16925 If you practice martial arts, or at least in judo, you're going to come across a cop or former cop at some point almost inevitably. Personally I avoid talking politics in dojos.
Anybody see the Khabib fight?
>>18075 I wanted to, cause he's a good fighter, but it's too expensive, so I'll wait until free recordings can be found.
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Thoughts on rolling/falling heel strikes? Came across these recently when thinking about what would theoretically be the most powerful type of kick, and I think it's some variation of these. I've been doing karate for quite a long time and am surprised to have never learned these kicks formally. I guess they're popular in Kyokushin schools, a sport-oriented branch of karate not unlike taekwondo. My own style of karate is all about self-defense and we generally discourage overly complicated kicks you can see coming a mile away and especially sacrifice moves that leave you on the ground. We only do fancier stuff like flying kicks for fitness. But I have to admit I've fallen in love with this recently: cool acrobatic kicks are one of the reasons I got into martial arts in the first place. Trying to learn this from my apartment during the social isolation without access to a gym, but I just don't have enough space to avoid slamming into things. Video related: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xr2StCdq4M0
>>18086 If you can do them on concrete without breaking something, go for it, i guess. Getting prone in a real fight is bad though. Always.
>>18085 I found an upload here, though its slightly cut https://youtu.be/fYVYXdBTle4 >>18086 Looks powerful but really difficult to pull off in a combat
what is a good form of hand-to-hand to learn for a smaller guy
>>18112 handshake and polite smile.
>>18112 Boxing, Mike Tyson peekaboo style
>>18415 Boxing is pretty shit for actual fights.
>>18423 How?
>>18436 Seriously? Because it is a sport and very specialized one at that. First of all, for a sport that specializes strictly in punching it doesn't teach you how to punch properly by making you wear gloves. I have seen shitload of bozers busting their fists because they don't know how to even make one properly, not even mentioning knowing how to hit and where to hit so that you don't break your hand. It is something that you need to practice constantly. Second, it doesn't teach you anything except highly defensive sport style against single opponent who will only punch you into head and torso. It is not very good style to learn unless you already an experienced fighter and can adapt it's techniques to different environment. Most of the sport styles are only good at getting you better conditioning and pain resistance. You can get that with just doing gymnastics. Some sports are especially retarded though and actually can endanger you in a real fight. Boxing and bjj are prime examples.
>>18437 Curious on thoughts of taekwondo or competitive kickboxing training applied in a real self-defense situation. How does for example a spinning kick or an axe kick compare to going to the ground or ignoring lower body defense like wrestler or boxer? A bit better or just as bad/worse?
>>18438 Not all wrestling have to go to the ground. A lot of traditional wrestling styles actually don't do that. Goung to the ground is a big no-no in the fight. The usefullness is very situational but danger is constant. Which is why i said that bjj is bad. In fact my opinion it is the shitties sport you can learn in regards to real fight. A regular kickboxing is ok as far as sport can be ok in this matter. If by spinning kick you mean something like ushiro geri, it is useful in the fight, but all big moves require setup for them to work. Effectiveness of the kicks depend very much on your stability and agility, so it is something you need to train for a long time before you can reliably use it in the fight.
>learn Krava Maga >knee Netanyahu in the balls and break his arm >learn Brazilian jujitsu >choke out Bolsonaro >learn Maui Thai >Kick the king of Thailand straight in his head this is based.
>>18438 I’ve trained taekwondo for years, in terms of of practical application I would say it’s better for conditioning/training than actual fights. Spin kicks can be effective as misdirection, but they’re too risky to pull off. An axe kick I wouldn’t attempt in a real fight as the higher you kick the more you’re raising your center of gravity/throwing off your balance. However, it’s excellent to practice as it makes your legs very agile. For a street fight though I’d stick to muay thai kicks and maybe a few low taekwondo side kicks to the knees or something.
>>18672 >in terms of of practical application I would say it’s better for conditioning/training than actual fights Also a long time Tae Kwon Do practitioner, I don't know what school your were taught in, but it's very much applicable to actual fights. >spin kicks I assume this is a general statement for kicks like Wheel kick and Turning side. I have to say that this is is blatantly untrue. A wheel kick is devastating, I've seen it and done it. The same goes for Turning side kick or 360 roundhouse. Whether an individual is good enough to use this in practical fights is a different matter that depends on the physical limitations or circumstances of that individual. A former sparring partner of mine could do a mean turning side kick, but a workplace accident led to him being unable to do it properly anymore. >the higher you kick the more you’re raising your center of gravity/throwing off your balance That's a load of bullshit. This only applies to swinging/spinning kicks and is countered by the fact that you use your body as part of the momentum and as a counter-balance; either bend back or bend forward with the kick. This honestly sounds like a problem related to you specifically m8, most likely incorrectly doing the kicks habitually.
>>18672 >>18672 Would you ever use a hook kick in a self defense context?
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>>18423 >Boxing is pretty shit for actual fights. >>18437 >Because it is a sport and very specialized one at that. First of all, for a sport that specializes strictly in punching it doesn't teach you how to punch properly by making you wear gloves. >Second, it doesn't teach you anything except highly defensive sport style against single opponent who will only punch you into head and torso. >Some sports are especially retarded though and actually can endanger you in a real fight. Boxing...are prime examples. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mZHDMhbcJvA https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UFTAWeJJGeM https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cZ0Qz-yqnUc https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jGzdbpqAiRg https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gM_3PYt68ls https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AmXNYZ4xGmw https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GWfU86aAYvU https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TNJiMXorld0 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3hR0sFj2xvs https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jGJHgCNDJlI
>>18762 What is it you think your videos prove? Do you have an argument?
>>18847 >What is it you think your videos prove? Do you have an argument? Gee, idk, that boxing is highly effective in actual fights maybe? Something that would be obvious if you actually watched even just the first video, where a boxer knocks out multiple attackers? You're the one who argued that "boxing is pretty shit for actual fights" yet there are tons and tons of videos on the internet that indicate the exact opposite.
>>18849 >You're the one who argued that "boxing is pretty shit for actual fights" Not even the anon you're replying to. Videos can be found of people defending themselves with most fighting disciplines, anecdotes aren't really an argument one way or another for their relative effectiveness. You didn't respond to most of that anon's arguments. I would even venture to guess that some of those boxers in those videos hurt their hands in aiming for the jaw just as that poster claimed.
>>18762 Learn to read >It is not very good style to learn unless you already an experienced fighter and can adapt it's techniques to different environment. Boxing as a style isn't good for fights. Boxers can be good at actual fights, more often than not, because they have actual experience of them and adapted techniques to different environment. It is not something everybody can do, so it's better to pick a style where you don't have overcome plenty of glaring weaknesses in the first place. Also, any sport will make you better at fights than untrained normies (especially drunk ones like in many of your videos), do we need to have an argument if powerlifting should be considered a fighting style?
>>18862 To add, in more than half of your videos, i can bet my balls it's not even a boxer, judging by movement and striking techniques. Just because someone punched somebody else with a hand doesn't make him a boxer, even if the video on youtube says so.
>>18674 No hook kick is among the swinging kicks that requires a lot of proficiency to use well. A wheel kick would be easier to be honest. The best use of a hook kick IRL is to strike the back of the leg of an opponent before coming in with an upper-body blow.
>>18863 >To add, in more than half of your videos, i can bet my balls it's not even a boxer, judging by movement and striking techniques. Look at just that first video of the guy knocking out multiple attackers. Notice his quick sideways and downward head movement when he evades the initial strikes from the first guy who attacks him, how he holds his hands up, his footwork, his timing, his distance management, the way he uses the jab to set up counters on the attackers charging in, the combos. That's not something you're born knowing how to do. That's something you have to learn by practicing the proper techniques with a coach and actually applying those techniques through sparring in a gym to gain experience.
>>18673 >I assume this is a general statement for kicks like Wheel kick and Turning side. I have to say that this is is blatantly untrue. A wheel kick is devastating, I've seen it and done it. The same goes for Turning side kick or 360 roundhouse. Whether an individual is good enough to use this in practical fights is a different matter that depends on the physical limitations or circumstances of that individual. A former sparring partner of mine could do a mean turning side kick, but a workplace accident led to him being unable to do it properly anymore. Of course the physical limitations matter, that’s why when I said it isn’t practical I was thinking more about an average taekwondo student or practitioner. A master of any martial arts would be better off in a street fight against a normie so that’s not really a point. And sparring is not the same as a real fight, in a real street fight you don’t have the luxury of miscalculating or wasting a move. I would not attempt a spin kick in a real street fight. Even the act of turning your head to spot the target is time that you are not looking at your opponent (however brief you may consider it to be). >That's a load of bullshit. This only applies to swinging/spinning kicks and is countered by the fact that you use your body as part of the momentum and as a counter-balance; either bend back or bend forward with the kick. Again I was speaking in terms of the average practitioner. Most people do not have the flexibility for high kicks and throwing a high kick would be putting them off balance. Even then I wouldn’t throw high kicks either because they’re traveling a longer distance and are easier to catch. Just look at all the taekwondo matchups with a muay thai expert, tkd always gets BTFO’d because thais are very good at catching. Also in a street fight with adrenaline pumping you’re more likely to overextend the kick and throw yourself off balance. These are pointless risks that are not worth taking. Street fights happen fast and I would not be doing any flashy tornado kicks to their face. Also spin kicks are not that accurate and hard to land on a moving target. Sounds like you need to spar with people outside your tkd circlejerk.
>>18909 All your arguments are just basically >hey you're just (somehow) super special because you're good at training 1) No-one says TKD would be picked up in a year, however I can definitely say that my flexibility, strength and balance improved within the first year I STARTED. 2) I wouldn't call myself a Master of TKD 3) Adrenalin overextensions, 'timewasteing' and other issues are literally nitpicking. This is what training is supposed to be for, to practice and improve abilities until they are applicable IRL. That's literally every martial art ever. >spar with people outside tkd I do. Probably the toughest opponents are kick-boxers who use grappling, for anyone inexperienced they're a pain... but that applies to literally anyone trained or not. Also on the topic of looking behind and wasting time. You do that with the momentum of the kick. Even dismissing that, front-kick hopping front kick are no joke and definitely pack a punch.
I played mortal kombat ever since i was in elementary school am i a qualified martial artist?
>>18672 >However, it’s excellent to practice as it makes your legs very agile. Karate guy here, I'd say I have exceptionally graceful, precise, and powerful kicks among my peers, but I don't actually use kicks too often while sparring because I've always felt like my legs are just a little too slow or obvious. What particular aspects of your training would you characterize as making your legs agile?
>>19027 > What particular aspects of your training would you characterize as making your legs agile? TKD dude here. The best training for leg speed is weights and kicking high as possible as hard and fast as possible every day. It makes your mid-body kicks and swings much faster. Also focus on technique. The small details like bending the knee before a sidekick, for example, become key as you progress, as it is a pre-requisite for maintaining your kick's power as you increase speed. Also practise double kicks forcing your leg to move low then high at full power forces the muscles to adapt.
>>18997 The original anon asked about spin kicks being useful and you were trying to argue that they were and now in your response you’re implying front kicks are effective and you struggle with kickboxers. That was the whole point, it’s better for conditioning than training. Front kicks are not unique to Tkd and Muay Thai technique is better. > 1) No-one says TKD would be picked up in a year, however I can definitely say that my flexibility, strength and balance improved within the first year I STARTED. See above >This is what training is supposed to be for, to practice and improve abilities until they are applicable IRL. There’s an element you can’t train in a street fight, tkd just makes certain crucial mistakes more likely to happen. Why train against overextension when you can just do some low kicks or something else in the first place. I can throw high kicks very easily and very fast to the face, I still wouldn’t risk it in a street fight unless I saw the opponent was weak/slow. > Also on the topic of looking behind and wasting time. You do that with the momentum of the kick. No that’s bad technique you spot first. I can still spot fast and kick high and fast but I would not chance it. Also the tkd stance is poor and bouncing wastes energy.
>>19053 I've tried to use ankle weights during martial arts routines before and it doesn't turn out like you'd think it might. They either shuffle around too much to be useful or you tighten them so hard they become painful and cut off your circulation.
>>19058 >avoid pain >martial arts Srsly though if those don’t work there are other things you can do like focus mitt drills, or you can try ankle straps with resistance bands. Though resistance bands are kind of annoying. Target practice, speed practice switching around targets really fast develops reflexes. Also if you’re like me and want to be a weirdo, try doing more household tasks with your legs and feet only like those cripplefags.
>>18882 And your point is? Nothing you said contradicts what i said.
>>19058 >it doesn't turn out like you'd think it might This sounds like a you problem

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