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(12.96 KB 1280x152 VEB_Robotron.png)
Comrade 04/22/2016 (Fri) 15:26:19 No. 952
A leftist /tech/ board is great! Let's use it more, comrades!
Are any oldfags around who had the joy to come in contact with pic related or other micro electronics from real socialistic states? Sadly I was born too late to have a opinion on their products.

I read DDR lightbulbs were more durable than the western ones because they had no planned obsolesence; what do you think would our society today look like, if more elecronic products like smartphones were designed with a much longer lifetime in mind? Would the use-value of the products stay the same over time, or would it decrease with technical progress?
>>42
Not a oldfag, but my understanding is that most of Robotron's and indeed the post-70s Soviet computers were just copies of western consumer models. So they didn't even have say the introspection, garbage collection, and protections of lisp machines in the same time period.

I'm aware of one consumer soviet computer which I'm particularly found of and that's the Electronika BK. It was the only model in the soviet union to be massed produced for the home market and developed a demo scene, along with substantial homebrew development.
>What do you think would our society today look like, if more elecronic products like smartphones were designed with a much longer lifetime in mind? Would the use-value of the products stay the same over time, or would it decrease with technical progress?

You get more standardisation, less form over function sacrifices (works better but has worse design), as far as durability goes , it depends long lasting batteries are just hard to make, what you definitely would get is better repairability.

For smartphones you'd probably would have seen magnetic field tracked pens (used in graphic tablets) rather then the currently capacitive touchscreens, because the magnetic pens are easier to make and more precise, Resulting in a renaissance of handwritten text and social/cultural trends/development around penmanship and quick sketches.

You'd probably would have seen a universal interface scheme, where all sorts of devices no longer would have buttons and nobs but rather an IR-port that turns your smartphone into a remote for everything. Also a much greater R&D focus on sensors turning smartphones in a portable scanner.

Since socialism has a sort of protected commons that isn't at risk of being enclosed, you'd see more people contributing to projects like user-generated "cartography" type stuff where people digitize "note-worthy" features of "meat-space". Enabled by the scanner functionality.

>Would the use-value of the products stay the same over time, or would it decrease with technical progress?

I'm not sure what you mean with this, you might get better backporting for software to run on older technology, because there aren't any IP laws blocking people from pruning software to make it run.
>>826
I've been trying to find some more information on the original systems operating in the Soviet Union. Especially those earlier systems that showed some promise and interesting features. I've been looking specifically at the BESM-6 due to the ample documentation available. The most interesting features to me are the system of modes, and bit packing, both of which seem very odd but interesting to me, oh also it's RISC which is nice. The CPU was also developed under the name Elbrus into the late 80's which is unique, and was reasonably competitive at the time. The Elbrus-3 which was a completely new ISA with novel VLIW capabilities was also competitive.
http://www.mailcom.com/besm6/
http://www.mailcom.com/besm6/instset.shtml
https://computerhistory.org/blog/the-elbrus-2-a-soviet-era-high-performance-computer/

Would any of you happen to have any information on the MIR «Машина для Инженерных Расчётов» machines? I'm struggling to find any information on them but they sound fascinating especially concerning "a hardware implementation of a high-level programming language capable of symbolic manipulations" which reminds me of the exceptional Scheme-48. Also it seems to be immensely capable for its size. Thanks in advance!
>>832
Unfortunately it seems there is very little information on this machine on the internet. I found a few Russian PDFs which I was not able to machine translate, and a few websites which I was, none very informative. It's extremely interesting though, here are the web pages I was able to find, you'll have to use Google to get translations unless you speak Russian though:
https://ru.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/МИР
https://ru.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Аналитик_(язык_программирования)
http://ukrainiancomputing.org/ITgl_r.html
https://web.archive.org/web/20121124182610/http://iprinet.kiev.ua/gf/mir.htm

Oh and hear is a interesting detailed website dedicated to the computers used in Soviet rockets. I haven't finished reading it yet:
https://web.mit.edu/slava/space/introduction.htm
>>826
Apparently someone managed to squeeze a UNIX V6 clone onto the BK-0011. I don't even like UNIX and I think that's pretty cool! https://github.com/sergev/bkunix
832
>Scheme-48
I meant SCHEME-79 here, which was a hardware implementation of Scheme Sussman, Steel and several others worked on together. Scheme-48 is a fairly standard Scheme implementation although it has PreScheme as a intermediate language which is a bit interesting.

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