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Comrade 10/23/2019 (Wed) 17:12:51 No. 6 [Reply] [Last]
it's time to rise up /hobby/
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>>6
>Rick
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>>155
Yeah that's the only problem with that image
Society is a spook.
The concept of 'spook' is a spook in all of itself too.
>>35
>he was an incel
Makes sense

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Graphic Design General Comrade 08/13/2019 (Tue) 17:07:10 No. 414 [Reply] [Last]
I'm dumping some icons we could use for a cybersocialist planning software.
2 posts and 6 images omitted.
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Two here make use of the Technocracy Movement's colors.
>>486
BASED
>>483
these look the best color wise imo, whole design is great tho good work

Honestly Anonymous Comrade 10/23/2019 (Wed) 20:59:32 No. 1193 [Reply] [Last]
I feel kinda comfy here.
Maybe this wasn't a bad idea after all.
Thanks for saying so, hopefully it will turn out okay and the /tech/ people will come around.
It's nice in here so far. Actually getting traffic too.

>>1200
All four of /tech/'s population?
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>>1240
/tech/fag here, at least this board isn't dead
>>1250
...yet

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dubtrack thread sputnik##SgNipD 10/23/2019 (Wed) 18:08:05 No. 1133 [Reply] [Last]
i will keep this fucking thing alive even if it kills me

https://www.dubtrack.fm/join/leftypol-comrades
Music is the best medium to reach the masses
>>1133
It's dead chief
Why is it not on cytu.be?
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Why aren't you listening?

Sixty Nine
In the sunshine.
Sixty Nine.

https://youtu.be/1FGtd3oH_PQ

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What is to be done Comrade 10/15/2019 (Tue) 16:53:01 No. 21 [Reply] [Last]
The misses watches last week tonight with john oliver. It is seriously corrupting her revolutionary potential with some cold hard neoliberal properganda. Ive tried showing her the empire files debunk of Venezuela but oliver did, but she wasnt having any of it. Plz halp! She also watches Samantha bee which is fundamentally worse
>She also watches Samantha bee
You should probably just put her out to pasture.
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>>479
Ikr? But the weird thing is shes been in one union or another all her working life. And Im not claiming that unions are more revolutionary, just the fact that she is aware of class, but now its;
>poc this
And
>woc that
And
>aoc said this
>>23
tbh lots of unions got pretty diverted yeah.
In my view, intersectionality just means that all these struggles (or at least, their material basis for being a struggle) intersects at class.
And that therefore, the best way to ensure everyone's rights is through the class struggle.
The US had to fight many decades for women's rights, and many more for black people's rights.
But in the GDR, USSR and Rojava, it's included in the package.
Ultimately, the left needs to get rid of the image that it's only for minorities. The white male worker shouldn't feel afraid he would lose his voice.
Nobody wants that.

Comrade 09/27/2019 (Fri) 19:09:26 No. 296 [Reply] [Last]
Emma Stone is an amazing actress
shes hot but average acting at best. Why exactly do you think she is "amazing"
>>354
She makes me weak comrade
I think she had extractions which is why she has those terrible nasolabial folds.
>>444
>she had extractions which is why she has those terrible nasolabial folds.
does that translate to the dentist fucked up her face when pulling out teeth ?
>>300
Yes but pulling back the front teeth to close the gaps they created made it even worse.

Comrade 10/14/2019 (Mon) 19:56:15 No. 959 [Reply] [Last]
hey guys I've been working on a website, here's what I got so far
written in symfony
https://tiblar.com
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>>952
>You get a rare straggler like @media queries for pointers and hover which were only added in firefox 64 (and so aren't in firefox-esr) but those are pretty rare.
Amusingly the last firefox-esr to not support @media (any-pointer: fine) and similar media queries had its support dropped yesterday.
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I was bored, so instead of fixing the broken part of the CSS I posted yesterday I decided to write a Red Yotsuba theme. Maybe a little too breast cancer awareness, but I like it overall. What do you guy's think?

It's possible to make really clean CSS theme selector using custom properties and <select> tags, I might do that next and just have a dark, yotsuba, and red yotsuba theme.
>>964
>that subtitle
Can you explain that please?
Like, they'll be up on the gallows and once they get hanged they start trying to bid for the noose while they are gasping for air?
>>965
It's a Stalin quote, if I remember correctly he said this while the Soviet Union was buying massive amounts of foreign equipment to modernize manufacturing. GAZ is a good example of a factory made in this way.

In the case of a /tech/ or /g/ type board the implication is that we can use the technology that the bourgeoisie provide us as weapons against them.
>It's possible to make really clean CSS theme selector using custom properties and <select> tags, I might do that next and just have a dark, yotsuba, and red yotsuba theme.
I was kinda dead wrong about this, it seem barely even possible to have a theme selector of the sort I was thinking. I guess the way to solve this then would be to have slightly different URLs for each theme. Some sort of simple subdomain would likely be best. A bit disappointing though.

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Comrade 04/22/2016 (Fri) 15:26:19 No. 952 [Reply] [Last]
A leftist /tech/ board is great! Let's use it more, comrades!
Are any oldfags around who had the joy to come in contact with pic related or other micro electronics from real socialistic states? Sadly I was born too late to have a opinion on their products.

I read DDR lightbulbs were more durable than the western ones because they had no planned obsolesence; what do you think would our society today look like, if more elecronic products like smartphones were designed with a much longer lifetime in mind? Would the use-value of the products stay the same over time, or would it decrease with technical progress?
1 post omitted.
>What do you think would our society today look like, if more elecronic products like smartphones were designed with a much longer lifetime in mind? Would the use-value of the products stay the same over time, or would it decrease with technical progress?

You get more standardisation, less form over function sacrifices (works better but has worse design), as far as durability goes , it depends long lasting batteries are just hard to make, what you definitely would get is better repairability.

For smartphones you'd probably would have seen magnetic field tracked pens (used in graphic tablets) rather then the currently capacitive touchscreens, because the magnetic pens are easier to make and more precise, Resulting in a renaissance of handwritten text and social/cultural trends/development around penmanship and quick sketches.

You'd probably would have seen a universal interface scheme, where all sorts of devices no longer would have buttons and nobs but rather an IR-port that turns your smartphone into a remote for everything. Also a much greater R&D focus on sensors turning smartphones in a portable scanner.

Since socialism has a sort of protected commons that isn't at risk of being enclosed, you'd see more people contributing to projects like user-generated "cartography" type stuff where people digitize "note-worthy" features of "meat-space". Enabled by the scanner functionality.

>Would the use-value of the products stay the same over time, or would it decrease with technical progress?

I'm not sure what you mean with this, you might get better backporting for software to run on older technology, because there aren't any IP laws blocking people from pruning software to make it run.
>>826
I've been trying to find some more information on the original systems operating in the Soviet Union. Especially those earlier systems that showed some promise and interesting features. I've been looking specifically at the BESM-6 due to the ample documentation available. The most interesting features to me are the system of modes, and bit packing, both of which seem very odd but interesting to me, oh also it's RISC which is nice. The CPU was also developed under the name Elbrus into the late 80's which is unique, and was reasonably competitive at the time. The Elbrus-3 which was a completely new ISA with novel VLIW capabilities was also competitive.
http://www.mailcom.com/besm6/
http://www.mailcom.com/besm6/instset.shtml
https://computerhistory.org/blog/the-elbrus-2-a-soviet-era-high-performance-computer/

Would any of you happen to have any information on the MIR «Машина для Инженерных Расчётов» machines? I'm struggling to find any information on them but they sound fascinating especially concerning "a hardware implementation of a high-level programming language capable of symbolic manipulations" which reminds me of the exceptional Scheme-48. Also it seems to be immensely capable for its size. Thanks in advance!
>>832
Unfortunately it seems there is very little information on this machine on the internet. I found a few Russian PDFs which I was not able to machine translate, and a few websites which I was, none very informative. It's extremely interesting though, here are the web pages I was able to find, you'll have to use Google to get translations unless you speak Russian though:
https://ru.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/МИР
https://ru.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Аналитик_(язык_программирования)
http://ukrainiancomputing.org/ITgl_r.html
https://web.archive.org/web/20121124182610/http://iprinet.kiev.ua/gf/mir.htm

Oh and hear is a interesting detailed website dedicated to the computers used in Soviet rockets. I haven't finished reading it yet:
https://web.mit.edu/slava/space/introduction.htm
>>826
Apparently someone managed to squeeze a UNIX V6 clone onto the BK-0011. I don't even like UNIX and I think that's pretty cool! https://github.com/sergev/bkunix
832
>Scheme-48
I meant SCHEME-79 here, which was a hardware implementation of Scheme Sussman, Steel and several others worked on together. Scheme-48 is a fairly standard Scheme implementation although it has PreScheme as a intermediate language which is a bit interesting.

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Code of Conduct(s) Comrade 09/24/2019 (Tue) 23:49:55 No. 923 [Reply] [Last]
Perhaps a declaration of technical principles would be a better term, but regardless the necessity of finding a means (beyond licenses out of necessity) to secure our software from outside meddling seems to be all the more essential the more I think about it. There are approximately 90 CVE's (70% due to memory safety) in each Linux kernel major version, many of which remain outstanding even after moving to the next version, with the average lifespan between 3 and 6 years for "high" and "critical" bugs. The Linux kernel is now approaching 28 million lines of poorly documented code, making it completely beyond what a actual audit is capable of assessing, beyond comprehension. More than this the development of the kernel and funding of the foundation are almost entirely in corporate hands. Linux is but a example, every large component of major infrastructure (and rest assured if it's major infrastructure it will become large) suffers from similar plights.

What I'm not attempting to advance here is the suckless philosophy. In my opinion suckless goes beyond attempting to restrict the scope of their projects to an obsession with SLOC to the point of harming correctness and completeness (for a sound list of necessary features see here: http://www.loper-os.org/?p=284). They do not document their programs, following the mantra that code is documentation (which is true but insufficient). Additionally they fail to critique the accepted protocols and divisions of applications, which would allow them to not only make more correct complete software, but also to make in aggregate simpler software. As a example why make a separate windowing system, terminal multiplexer, terminal emulator, and text editor when these things could all be combined as extensions of one another. Why separate your text editor from your web browser? Why work with text streams and the file system instead of having a single address space? Why take X-Server for granted rather than building of Linux's frame-buffer.

What issues is it that I'm pointing at here exactly:
a) scope creep
b) illiterate programming
c) unquestioned assumptions (primarily those given to us by unix)
d) over-optimization (understandability, and completeness should be prioritized over micro-optimizations)
e) insecure technologies (for example unassisted manual memory management, and unchecked type wraps)
f) incomplete software (corner cases handled etc)

Can you think of any more, or a consolidation of the terms listed here?
23 posts and 4 images omitted.
>c) unquestioned assumptions (primarily those given to us by unix)
What are these "unquestioned assumptions given to us by unix"?
Should I read "The Unix Hater's Handbook" to know? Would I be better served reading something else?
>>866
>What are these "unquestioned assumptions given to us by unix"? Should I read "The Unix Hater's Handbook" to know? Would I be better served reading something else?
That's a great book, although at this point many of the complaints are outdated you can still see some of the impacts, I'd encourage you to read it. Reading summaries of the Unix philosophy critically after reading https://www.dreamsongs.com/WorseIsBetter.html is also a good introduction.

The most important thing though I think is to just think critically about what Unix supports. Is it actually reasonable to say that every program should serialize and parse its data rather than just passing actual data structures? Is it acceptable that there are no safety measures making things as simple as moving, editing, or deleting a files foot guns? Is it tolerably that programs' source can't be inspected and edited live like in Emacs but rather we have to make forks and separate applications for even the most simple change, if we're lucky we have a cumbersome add-on system opaque to the user. etc.
>>857
I'm struggling to come up with a nice rule, or set of rules for what a good program's objectives should be. It's a much more complex issue that these issues of representation I've dealt with so far. It seems to me the most important semantic rule is that the program's objectives should be in the interest of their user. I can't really think of more than this.

I don't know if I'll leave it at that or not.
>>866
>>873
Here's a list of operating systems with a number of features better and more interesting than UNIX, TempleOS isn't listed here, but other than that seems pretty solid: https://news.ycombinator.com/item?id=10957020
Guess I'll wrap up these principles into a nice toasty CoC:

>Thou shalt operate in the interests of thy users, this is the ultimate commandment. Thy users will not always know what's best for them, so we may disagree with them, but try as we must to serve them.
>Thou shalt make thy user interfaces as physically and mentally ergonomic as possible, while recognizing often we are not capable of making interfaces capable of providing this for every situation, and thusly must allow for customization. When thy hath been forced to trade off between the interests of the users and the interface or artistic direction thy will always side with the users. This is the penultimate commandment all else is tertiary.
>Thou shalt make thy source code including the entire stack as understandable as possible. Certain components likely must be complex to reduce the undesirability of the system over all. Thy shalt always sacrifice undesirability for the sake of the interface and the users, but never for anything else.

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Comrade 07/16/2016 (Sat) 08:45:20 No. 301 [Reply] [Last]
Who else spends his hard earned (or state given ;^) ) money frequently on commodity fetishes like M:tg cards? How is such behaviour to justify (there is no right living in the wrong)?

One pal of mine tries to get me into his rpg-group, and I'm honestly thinking about it, even tough I don't have much interest anymore in high fantasy-rpgs.

Any other non-vidya gamers around?
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I prefer real games like Hearts, Rook, Rummy, etc. Collectible card scams so blatantly favor the rich weak-willed that they can't seriously be considered games. Games that require one to "collect" the ruleset by buying individual pieces are disgusting examples of predatory capitalism. I'm surprised people don't compare Magic: The Gathering to the day-one purchasable DLC that video game enthusiasts despise so much.
>>329
>I'm surprised people don't compare Magic: The Gathering to the day-one purchasable DLC that video game enthusiasts despise so much.
But, they do? Day-one DLC can be anything, like strictly cosmetic things. DLC in single-player titles isn't the worst kind of DLC. The worst kind is when you have a competitive title and the DLC gives you an edge. The shittiness with Magic's business model is specifically that it's like that type of DLC, combined with gambling no less.

What would be a "socialist twist" to collectible card games? Caning. Perhaps going the opposite route. Adding extra cards to your basic set only makes you weaker, but if you win under these conditions, you can take a handicapping card from your opponent or something like that. These cards better be pretty. Or maybe we'll just rip off the existing concepts with the only difference that you can't buy the cards anywhere, instead kids get them for top grades or doing pioneer stuff.
>>331
>pioneer shit
I think by making a game out of merit badges one could really incentives participation. You could set up a points list where at each level you could save your points to redeem for higher level cards or spend them on lower items: in this way you could also implement some sort of lesson on the ltv.
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>>329
Traditional card games are boring as fuck though, part of the fun of MTG is the artwork, the story, and the increasing complexity of card effects and their interactions with each other. Although it won't ever fly in a store, I've had friends that build decks online and just print the cards out on regular paper and stick them into sleeves.
>>67
I played MTG everyday for a long time but I eventually got tired of it. I'm sure if I knew more people I'd be more into it again. I'd love to have an RPG group and play Vampire: The Masquerade that shits awesome

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