/edu/ - Education

Education, Literature, History, Science

catalog
Mode: Thread
Name
E-mail
Subject
Message

Max message length: 8192

Files

Max file size: 80.00 MB

Max files: 5

Captcha
Password

(used to delete files and postings)

Misc

Remember to follow the rules


(55.34 KB 704x517 Screenshot_2020-08-12 Verso.png)
Verso Books 40% off Comrade 08/12/2020 (Wed) 01:04:15 No. 2973 [Reply] [Last]
I wanted to let everyone know that Verso Books is having a sale were everything is 40% off. They have books by Zizek, David Harvey, classics from marx, lenin, trotsky, etc. Take a look if you want to satisfy your commodity fetish in the form of paperbacks.
5 posts and 3 images omitted.
>>2982 I've read Sex and Failed Absolute. is that basically the same as Absolute Recoil?
>order from Verso >over 5 weeks shipping time >it's all cheap thin print-on-demand tier paper
>>2973 >They have pretentious shit, confused shit, and good books that are in the public domain and online already. 40 % off!! Wooooow.
>>3911 They really should switch to acid free paper.
>>3911 I've never ordered directly from Verso, but yeah, their books are shit quality. Not only paper-wise. Some are OCRed from other publisher's editions that were sold out, with absolutely no quality checks. So you get wrong letters and missing punctuation. This level of sloppiness for such a publisher is simply incomprehensible to me. If I knew it'd be this bad I'd rather get a torned up used copy of the other publisher's sold out edition for a heavily inflated price. Fuck Verso. Never again.

/math/ general Comrade 04/04/2020 (Sat) 17:37:10 No. 344 [Reply] [Last]
All good communists study math. What are you studying right now? What is your favorite field of mathematics and why? Personally, I really like the book "Linear Algebra Done Right" by Sheldon Axler. It is on Libgen if you are interested and I attached a pdf.
107 posts and 19 images omitted.
(3.68 KB 276x64 bessel.PNG)
this is now an applied math thread. abstractists gtfo Post ODEs/PDEs
(160.57 KB 1239x131 Capture.PNG)
>>3406 many many courses on youtube. if you want something more structured and gamified start with KhanAcademy.org The calculus playlist is great.
>>3405 for you ---> >>3890
I’m taking differential equations and my textbook is useless as fuck. is there an accessible alternative that has more example problems?
>>366 Do you happen to know any good courses online or whatever on discrete math? I found it pretty interesting but my professor was NOT GOOD at explaining the material and since COVID happened we kind of rushed through the class so I left feeling like I didn't entirely understand all of it

(259.18 KB 1080x608 1596687798695.png)
the dark islam within lovecraftian horror. Anonymous 08/06/2020 (Thu) 17:36:48 No. 2921 [Reply] [Last]
His works contain explicit references to ancient islamic texts, some say cosmic horror is a pessimistic inversion of sufist cosmology. Some of his stories, like the nameless city, is a direct reference to a story contained within the quran. Here are some direct quotes: >At one time I formed a juvenile collection of Oriental pottery and objets d’art, announcing myself as a devout Mohammedan and assuming the pseudonym of “Abdul Alhazred” – which you will recognise as the author of that mythical Necronomicon which I drag into various of my tales [...]. (letter to Edwin Baird, February 3, 1924) >The absurdity of the myth I was called upon to accept and the sombre greyness of the whole faith compared with the Eastern magnificence of Mahometanism, made me de-finitely agnostic [...].10 You can read more here: >https://www.researchgate.net/publication/272537419_The_Darker_Islam_within_the_American_Gothic_Sufi_Motifs_in_the_Stories_of_HP_Lovecraft
5 posts and 1 image omitted.
>>2925 It's just slow which means people who are interested in this sort of thing are more likely to see it eventually since the turnover if threads is less most people aren't on here 24/7 and this is a bitbof a niche topic
>>2927 *bit of
>>2927 Its niche but I like it.
I remembered from that the biography of Lovecraft included that in his homeschooling, he was able to read the thousand and one nights, developing an love for eastern culture, even adopting an arabic name (this of course is when he is a child). I'm glad he did it.I always liked his books, and I still love the city withouth name. Fucking ancient intelligent cocodriles, so ancient that even death has already died

(257.37 KB 1200x800 rasdf.jpeg)
Comrade 09/09/2020 (Wed) 16:30:52 No. 3908 [Reply] [Last]
Do you guys have a reading list on Ai and consciousness or AI and ethics? I really want to research this subject but I don't know where to start. I welcome any recommendation.
This was written by one of the pioneers of AI: https://archive.org/details/computerpowerhum0000weiz
>>3910 >>3924 Thank you!

(1.93 MB 1920x1304 communebarricade.png)
/ahg/ Alternate History General Comrade 04/14/2020 (Tue) 18:06:08 No. 1047 [Reply] [Last]
The Paris Commune successfully establishes socialism in France. What now? ITT: Post and speculate about alternate history.
4 posts and 1 image omitted.
Lenin lives to see WW2.
>>1086 Soviets still win
Kill yourselves
>>2190 have sex
(103.78 KB 276x396 Sylvis.jpg)
What if William H. Sylvis had lived longer? Could he have forged a stronger working class movement? Perhaps change the outcome of the Great Railroad Strike?

The scientific value of materialism Comrade 05/12/2020 (Tue) 21:20:53 No. 1572 [Reply] [Last]
Hello comrades. I have doubts about materialism since the philosophical part of Marxism isn't my strength, but I want to be able to understand it better since materialism is the foundation of marxist theory and the communist movement. I've had arguments in the past with people who claim that modern science doesn't prove materialism or that materialism cannot explain things like the origin of the universe or quantum mechanics. Well, where do I begin with this? Is materialism the truth? The most basic part of marxist philosophy is the assertion that matter is objectively real, right? How do I prove this then? Maybe one of you STEMlords around here can help me out with this. Any resources on this is appreciated.
40 posts and 7 images omitted.
>>2144 Your thought experiment is essentially a rehashed Einstein box underneath all your speculation about the plack constant. Any speculation about variability in this constant is unsupported by evidence - nothing in our current understanding of physics suggests that the value can be changed, and the Planck constant is far from unique in this respect. I suggest you read through the Bohr Einstein debates for a detailed understanding of why your thought experiment will fail to give a measurement of the electron's position to a higher precision than allowed by the uncertainty principle. The debates are based around a series of ultimately unsuccessful attempts to devise thought experiments to overcome the uncertainty principle. For a start you have neglected diffraction of the electron as it passed through the slit - the film will show a diffraction pattern spread over the level of uncertainty in the electron's position, not a point-like marker of the exact position. Even in an experiment where you can bypass this diffraction and narrow down the electron's position to a single point, you are then unable to read this measurement for the same reason you can't read the electron's position directly. In the case of a marker on a piece of film such as in your example, you are now faced with the problem of measuring the position of this marker to a precision smaller than the size of an electron. You cannot specify the exact position of your hole for the same reason. Since the apparatus is stationary and its momentum is constrained to zero with as much precision as your measurements allow, you are again faced with the same violation of the uncertainty principle. Your argument presupposes its own conclusion: in order to produce an experimental setup to measure an electron's position to an arbitrarily high precision, you must already have the ability to make such a measurement of the position of your instruments. However you try to approach the problem it is impossible to devise a method of overcoming the uncertainty principle, and any experiment you suggest will ultimately boil down to the same contradictions exposed in the Bohr Einstein debates. You seem to have a fundamental misunderstanding of the nature of the uncertainty principle. It does not arise as a result of our limited technological ability to measure these quantities, but rather as a fundamental property of quantum mechanics itself. Physicists have been attempting to disprove the uncertainty principle for close to 100 years. Any speculation about the philosophical nature of quantum mechanics must incorporate the uncertainty principle fully into its model of reality, unless you have sufficient experimental evidence to overturn one of the most fundamental principles of modern physics. Otherwise your suggestions have all the credibility of a perpetual motion machine. Your assertion that there is variation in quantities such as the electronic mass and charge is also completely unfounded. We have no evidence to suggest any such variation, and this would in fact contradict much of our knowledge of physics. The entire field of statistical mechanics treats quantum particles as fundamentally indistinguishable from each other, with any system remaining completely indentical under any possible rearrangement of its component electrons. From this assumption we can build up a statistical model of the system that predicts measurable quantities such as temperature and entropy that correspond to our experimental evidence. In fact there are entirely different predictions for distinguishable vs indistinguishable particles, with separate models describing the behaviour of particles that fit these two categories. If you would like to make the claim that electrons are in fact distinguishable, then you will need to come up with an entirely new formulation of statistical physics to explain away all of our evidence to the contrary.
(53.94 KB 1318x625 Box.jpg)
(47.59 KB 1205x533 frequency.jpg)
(24.61 KB 1380x517 position.jpg)
>>2244 No wonder modern physics has come to this state of decay. No evidence doesn't mean it doesn't exist. If from the beginning, you assume it doesn't exist, then you won't pay any effort to find it. It's not a thought experiment, but a matter of practical engineering. First, the environment exists homogeneous everywhere, that's because matter is not solid but full of hole, that's why we cannot isolate the environment inside the box from outside the box. So what we need is a very solid material, that could isolate inside and outside. And also the risk of explosion/implosion, because the difference between outside and inside environment. Therefore it must be a very very strong material. > For a start you have neglected diffraction of the electron as it passed through the slit - the film will show a diffraction pattern spread over the level of uncertainty in the electron's position, not a point-like marker of the exact position. Are you sure? https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZJ-0PBRuthc If what you said is right then the early controversial debate surrounding Copenhagen school made no sense. You should stop a little bit and read carefully what I've written. I never said my box is to receive the electron. My box is to see the flying trajectory of electron (and if possible, seeing the vibration state of the environment surrounding electron) > Your argument presupposes its own conclusion: in order to produce an experimental setup to measure an electron's position to an arbitrarily high precision, you must already have the ability to make such a measurement of the position of your instruments. You're right, but my intention is not to measure an electron's absolute position to an arbitrarily high precision. I just want to see the relative position of electron to the apparatus at a small enough particular moment. >Your argument presupposes its own conclusion: in order to produce an experimental setup to measure an electron's position to an arbitrarily high precision, you must already have the ability to make such a measurement of the position of your instruments. Again, what I need isn't arbitrarily high precision measurement of the apparatus, but ensure that the apparatus must be something very static, so that at high enough time resolution, we cannot see its vibration. If we make the whole apparatus in a rigid enough material, so that in the interaction with environment, the whole apparatus vibrate uniformly together, instead of each part of the apparatus interacting differently with environment. >You seem to have a fundamental misunderstanding of the nature of the uncertainty principle. It does not arise as a result of our limited technological ability to measure these quantities, but rather as a fundamental property of quantum mechanics itself. Physicists have been attempting to disprove the uncertainty principle for close to 100 years. Any speculation about the philosophical nature of quantum mechanics must incorporate the uncertainty principle fully into its model of reality, unless you have sufficient experimental evidence to overturn one of the most fundamental principles of modern physics. Otherwise your suggestions have all the credibility of a perpetual motion machine.

Message too long. Click here to view full text.

That was a good thread. Anybody still feel like discussing this?
>>3914 >That was a good thread. yes lota effortposts >Anybody still feel like discussing this? yes, go ahead
>>3914 Yes

(398.23 KB 598x566 tweet1.png)
is this true? Comrade 07/11/2020 (Sat) 21:12:51 No. 2277 [Reply] [Last]
but even if it's not, is this something that's possible? how do you develop the hermeneutics to read this fast?
9 posts omitted.
>>2277 WTF, you don't read at least 100 pages of information everyday? Repent, sinners. No wonder the civilization has decayed so much. Cease all the unnecessary normie activity everyday, instead focus on attain wizardhood
>>2277 skimming
>>2474 Given that he wrote notes on the side of the page often, I would reckon otherwise.
>>2277 You probably read an equivalent amount of content on your screen every day
>>2297 I think this is one of those rare brain conditions that is actually a positive benefit. My ex was diagnosed with it, but I can't remember the name of it.

(82.68 KB 2400x2400 death.png)
Case against Hierarchy Comrade 08/04/2020 (Tue) 11:32:58 No. 2866 [Reply] [Last]
Appealing to nature as an argument for hierarchy is a reactionary point of view used by many societies to make its underclasses tolerate their plight. There is a common misconception that natural selection always acts for the good of the species, therefore we should not bother changing anything about ourselves. Natural selection does not produce organisms perfectly suited to their environments. Social hierarchy typically runs counter to the needs which human beings have and creates conditions under which people become alienated from the valuable capacities that they possess. If we want human beings to thrive and realize their potential, we ought to meet their essential needs. Since hierarchy runs counter to these needs, it ought to be dismantled whenever possible. Human nature, far from being an argument against anarchism is a strong case for it, as a non-hierarchical society creates conditions under which human beings can unleash their true potential. Capitalism is one of the most dehumanizing forces in the world. It dehumanizes workers and bosses because it is a system that is inherently anti-human nature and human needs, forcing people to act more like robots who never get sick, rarely desire vacations, and never desire self-actualization, all to turn a higher profit. I think Marx's theory of alienation is spot on. Capitalism alienates humans from their own humanity, and it turns sacred things into commodities. The conditions of social hierarchy in which people are subjected to control from above, and in which people are encouraged to compete with one another for power and resources, creates an environment in which the needs for competence, relatedness and autonomy are not met, resulting in ill-being and alienation. Subordination to authority undermines autonomous motivation, reduces our intellectual and creative faculties, and ruptures our relationships with our peers. A human nature argument for anarchism can begin with something called the self-determination theory. Initially founded by Edward Deci and Richard Ryan, SDT posits that human beings have three key psychological needs: competence, relatedness, and autonomy. In a nutshell, we need to feel that we are effective in dealing with the environment around us and that we are good at what we do. We need to feel a sense of connection with the other human beings around us and that we are cared for by others. We need to feel that we have some sense of control over our lives, that we aren't just pawns on a chessboard, and that we are acting in accordance with our integrated sense of self and the values that we have developed over time. According to SDT, these essential needs are not learned but are inherent to human nature, and exist across all societies and cultures. Remember the human need for relatedness and consider that cooperative conditions are far more suited to meeting this need than competitive ones. As anarchists, we promote cooperation over competition precisely because we see cooperation as being fundamentally more in line with our human need to feel connected to others. To the extent that these needs are met, well-being is enhanced, and to the extent that there are thwarted, we can expect people to become ill and alienated. The model of human nature that SDT supports is, in my opinion, a stable base that lends itself well to anarchism. SDT shows that we call for anarchist forms of organization, because the core needs and drives we possess as human beings require it, and because social hierarchy runs counter to these needs and drives. A 2003 study published in the *Journal of Personality and Social Psychology* found support for the notion that we have a need for autonomy, and that this need is cross-cultural. >We found that whatever cultural practices one is considering, there appears to be a positive relation between more internalized or autonomous regulation of those practices and well-being, as measured through both hedonic (happiness) and eudaimonic (self-fulfillment) indicators (Ryan & Deci, 2001). Specifically, we found that whether one's behavior and attitudes are individualistic, collectivistic, horizontal, or vertical in nature, more autonomous enactment is associated with greater well-being. These findings support SDT's position regarding basic psychological needs and, more specifically, the controversial idea that autonomy is a basic human concern. >However, when considering horizontal versus vertical dimensions, we see more reason to hypothesize differences in the degree to which each can, on average, be more fully internalized. Specifically, we see the very nature of vertical social arrangements as more inherently conflictual, vis-à-vis SDT's postulated basic needs for autonomy and relatedness. Vertical societies frequently require individuals to forgo autonomy and to subordinate themselves to heteronomous influences. In addition, vertical societies place boundaries around those with whos intimacy and connectedness can be established. >In sum, this study shows that, across diverse cultures, the issue of autonomy can be similarly understood and that, across diverse practices, autonomy is associated with well-being. https://www.researchgate.net/publication/275714384_Differentiating_Autonomy_From_Individualism_and_Independence Another study by Edward Deci and Richard Ryan looked at the well-being of workers in state-owned companies in Bulgaria, and compared this with workers in a United States corporation. They found that, >The degree of autonomy-supportiveness of the work climate did predict overall need satisfaction in each culture, and need satisfaction in turn predicted both task engagement and well-being. Thus by showing that satisfying these needs promotes motivation and mental health across cultures, results of the study are consistent with the view that these needs are universal. https://selfdeterminationtheory.org/SDT/documents/2001_DeciRyanGagneLeoneEtal.pdf Autonomy is also an important need not just for adult workers, but for young people in school. A study looking at adolescent satisfaction with life in school found a relationship between support for autonomy and well-being across different cultures, particularly Denmark and the United States, >To the extent that adolescents felt that their parents and teachers understand their perspectives and allowed them to make their own choices, adolescents positively perceived their lives and their experiences in school. In contrast, when adolescents felt controlled by their parents and teachers, and felt that these authorities treated the adolescents' own experiences and choices as relatively unimportant, they reported lower satisfaction with life in school.

Message too long. Click here to view full text.

26 posts and 3 images omitted.
>>3902 At this point I'm pretty sure that anon is a teenager who decided he wanted to be a communist so he read a handful of short articles and thinks we know what lens he's using when he takes the negative positions itt. Upon being correctly dismissed for failing to present any logical case for his position he doubled down with obtuse examples that make sense from his frame of reference but have left us mystified because he never really elaborated on what he means by "competition" as it pertains to the OP or why every analysis of human interaction has to specifically reference propagation of the species. Hopefully in the future he reads more theory because the path of contrarianism leads more easily to reactionary thought.
>>3896 >social power imbalances that exist outside of material conditions within the bourgeoisie - proletarian paradigm but from those posts it seems like “hierarchy” is just a system of privileges. privileges are really just your rights to interact with certain items in a certain way. that’s the whole basis of property. which puts it under the Marxist definition of class.
>>3872 >>3897 >>3899 This is the type of person who uses "anarkiddie" unironically. Take a good look so that you know what kind of galactic intellect you're up against.
>>3906 >galactic intellect Nothing i said is hard to grasp, actually. OP argues that hierarchy prevents the full potential of humans and is therefore in contradiction to their nature. He ignores that individuals may benefit from supporting a hierarchy that is detrimental to society as a whole. In such a scenario there is no contradiction between human nature and the negative consequences thereof. The only way such a scenario can not exist is if selection operates not on the level of the individual, but that of the collective. >>3903 >but have left us mystified because he never really elaborated on what he means by "competition" Why am i asked to specify a term that OP used before me? It's fine if he uses it, but if greentext it then i suddenly have to "define" it? Get that shit out of here faggot. >or why every analysis of human interaction has to specifically reference propagation of the species If you talk about human nature and "key psychological needs" while coming up with a model that doesn't include evolution you are a brainlet, plain and simple. Not to mention that OP never specified why "competence, relatedness, and autonomy" are the end all be all of human nature. Selective sourcefagging.
>>3904 Forgive me for answering your question with more questions, but do you consider the leaders of the vanguard party to be proletarians? Would you say that they have more agency/autonomy than workers, the same because they represent the class, or less because they have to realize the ideals of a class that may not best represent their material interests?

(186.10 KB 1200x800 PRIVATELOANS0717_alt1.jpg)
How to improve English writing? Comrade 06/19/2020 (Fri) 00:47:10 No. 1973 [Reply] [Last]
I am an ESLer. How do I improve my English writing? My grammar, and punctuation is terrible. My writing vocabulary is terrible as well. Sometimes when I write, I take a long time because the right word or phrase is not on my mind. I have a large passive vocabulary, but I don't know how to use it, and turn it into active vocabulary. I am looking to improve my writing ability to a level where It would be easy for me to write papers for academic journals, and conferences. If you have any recommendations, please do post them.
14 posts omitted.
>>3803 >>3804 Why learn Latin? Could I learn Greek instead?
>>3875 Because Latin makes up like 80% of a our vocabulary whereas Greek only 6%? And those 6% came to us through Latin.
>>1973 Might sound obvious but read more books? Including fiction (ones that are considered to be well written that is)

/lit/ Comrade 04/12/2020 (Sun) 10:02:55 No. 808 [Reply] [Last]
What is your favorite book? What book influenced you the most? What do you like about books? what are you planning to read? What are you reading now? Saw this in /hobby/ but thought it fit more here
34 posts and 10 images omitted.
Oh you like reading, eh? Name every book.
>>808 >What is your favorite book? Dandelion wine by ray bradbury >What book influenced you the most? State and revolution by Vladimir Lenin >What do you like about books? There’s more room for interpretation than other forms of media >what are you planning to read? Haven’t read for whom the bell tolls yet, I was thinking of reading that >what are you reading now? Fall of the ottomans by Eugene Rogan
>>2818 magnet:?xt=urn:btih:e9e73292b797b1617869320745503b7447102324&dn=J.%20R.%20R.%20Tolkien%20-%20The%20Lord%20of%20the%20Rings%20(HarperCollins%20e-books%2C%202009)
>>2935 This led me nowhere
>What is your favorite book? The Non-Existent Knight by Italo Calvino because its genuinely funny and I like what it says about how we define our identities. >What book influenced you the most? Manufacturing Consent because it really opened my eyes to how different the world from how it was being presented to me. Maybe some poems in there as well about community but that's harder to pin point. >What do you like about books? Being able to talk to people about them and see how they relate to other things in culture >what are you planning to read? I want to find something about Weimar Berlin because I feel like that's relevant rn >What are you reading now? Boneshaker by Cherie Priest. I wanted to read something steampunk because that's where my mind was aesthetically when I started but it seems to be more about zombies than a cool Victorian alternative universe.

Delete
Report

no cookies?